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Definitions from Housekeeping Viewpoint

  • Soil—A substance residing where it is not wanted.
  • Binders—Grease, oil, or animal fat substances that hold other soil substances together and to a surface (e.g. A grease smudge)
  • Particulate—The parts of soil that are not binders.
  • Chemical Action—Detergent solutions penetrate, break-up, and capture soil.
  • Mechanical Action—Safely agitates solution/soil to achieve quicker results.
  • Microorganism—Single-cell living organism used by nature to recycle soil.
  • Germ—A microorganism having the potential to make a living thing sick.
  • pH—A chemistry test scale with measurement values used to determine the strength of an acid or alkaline solution–0 high acid, 14 high alkaline, 7 neutral.
  • Spent Solution—A washing solution that no longer has the capacity to hold soil.
  • Open Solution—A washing solution that has the capacity to hold soil.
  • Wet Mopping—The liberal application of a clean mopping solution followed by a thorough picking-up of the “dirty” solution.
  • Damp Mopping—The removing of a wet mop from a clean detergent solution and wringing out the solution well prior to mopping the floor. Do Not damp mop a greasy or highly-soiled floor–it should be wet mopped.
  • Finish Stripping—The use of a stripping solution total removal of a floor finish.
  • Finish Scrubbing—The use of a Fast-1-2-3 EFP detergent solution and a stripping or scrubbing pad to scrub to remove the top coat(s) of an in-place, soiled-impregnated floor finish. After rinsing and drying, finish is burnished and one or two coats of new finish applied.
  • Sanitize—To apply a germ-killing solution AFTER something has been washed and rinsed thoroughly. Once the sanitizer evaporates (dries), the germ-killing capacity is no longer effective.
  • Disinfect—The process of preparing a one-time use surface (e.g. operating room surfaces) for use in an operation where germs CANNOT be transferred from a surface to a living being. The disinfectant-detergent solution film is designed to grab, hold, and kill microscopic airborne germs that land on surfaces and not for soil loads deposited by touch with body parts. Click Here for a video explanation.
  • Detergent—A chemical that is mixed into water to create a solution that penetrates, breaks-up, and captures soil on a surface and allows the soil to be transported in the “dirty” solution to where it is OK (e.g. down the drain)
  • Degreaser—Originally, a degreaser was a detergent packed with very harsh “hot” chemicals to be used in a “hot” solution for removal of very bad soil accumulations. Degreasers were not for daily or routine use in place of regular detergents. Today, high-performance cold water detergents (e.g. Gabriel Fast-1-2-3 EFP) are so effective that the need for “old time” degreaser have been eliminated.
  • Biodegradable—Capable of decaying through the action of microorganisms.
  • Chemically Neutral—A chemical state that is neither acid nor alkaline. A pH of 7 is considered neutral. Soil binders do not have a pH because they do not mix with water. Whereas, the particulates being held by a soil binder are usually either acid or alkaline and therefore have a pH value. Therefore, when washing a surface, it is generally more effective when the detergent pH is opposite to the pH of the soil particulate–alkaline detergent for washing acid soil, and vice versa.
  • Viscosity—The thickness of a liquid which determines the speed at which it pours.